Stoller Vineyards

Stoller at Sunset Photo credit Lenny Rede

The Stoller’s established the property in 1943 and the vineyard fifty years later. Using 100% estate fruit, they control every step of the process, from pruning to bottling and everything in between. The result is award-winning wines that are balanced, complex, and consistently exceptional.

These are some of our favorite Oregon wines. What Melissa does is consistently create balanced wines that show off a purity of fruit and finesse too often lacking in today’s wine world.

Stoller Vineyards
Stoller Rose Photo credit Lenny Rede

“I strive to make wine that exemplifies the uniqueness of the vineyard and reflect the vintage with balance and elegance. Our Pinot Noir characteristically expresses a combination of red to darker fruits, spice, and fine-grain tannins. The volcanic soil, elevation, exposure, and weather of our Dundee Hills site all combine to create the perfect conditions for growing cool-climate wine grapes.” – Melissa Burr

Stoller Vineyards

Melissa Burr was raised in the Willamette Valley. After completing her Bachelor of Science degree, Melissa intended to practice naturopathic medicine before discovering her true passion was in wine. She studied winemaking and fermentation science at OSU and interned during harvest for several local wineries before becoming production winemaker for Cooper Mountain. In 2003, Melissa joined Stoller Family Estate as the winery’s first dedicated winemaker.

Stoller Vineyards

In her 14-year tenor with Stoller, Melissa has worked in concert with the vineyard team to oversee the site’s continued refinement. She has helped grow production from 1,000 cases to 60,000 while acting as a steward of Stoller’s legacy.

I recently visited the winery and was as usual blown away by the wines!

Visit them if you get the chance, and tell them Lenny sent you.

if you can’t here is a little video of what you are missing.

#OregonWineMonth

 

 

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Master Sommelier Larry Stone and Lingua Franca Wines

lin·gua fran·ca noun: “a language that is adopted as a common language between speakers whose native languages are different.”

Lingua Franca Vineyard LSV

The headline for this article could read: “Local Boy Does Good!” Larry Stone is one of the most influential people in the wine industry. (Period). One of the first Americans to pass the Master Sommelier exam (#9 in 1988), the only American ever to win France’s Grand Prix de Sopexa competition (better known as the “Best Sommelier in the World”). Wine director for Charlie Trotters. Founder (With Robert De Niro and Robin Williams) of the legendary Rubicon in San Francisco. Dean of Wine Studies at the International Culinary Center.

In 2006, he left the restaurant business to become the Gérant of the Niebaum-Coppola winery, now Inglenook. He worked with Augustine Huneeus at Quintessa, started his own Napa property Sirita and he also ran a négociant firm, Deux Chapeaux, with Daniel Johnnes. In 2010, Stone became president of Evening Land Vineyards, where he collaborated with Burgundian winemaker Dominique Lafon. Today, Evening Land is in the capable hands of Stone’s Protégé Rajat Parr.

In 2012, Stone started a new winery next door – Lingua Franca.

Master Sommelier Larry Stone and Lingua Franca Wines
Larry Stone tasting at Esquin

Stone brought together a team led by Dominique Lafon. Who is Burgundy’s best-known winemaker, his name is attached to one of its most famous Domaines -Comte Lafon. The Comtes Lafon domaine, contains well over three hectares of premier cru vineyard as well a piece of burgundy’s grand cru Le Montrachet. Lafon Montrachet sells for thousands of dollars a bottle. He has been rightly called “the Wizard of Burgundy.”

He also brought on board winemaker Thomas Savre, who worked with stone and Lafon at Evening Land after working at luminary Burgundian properties as Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, Domaine Dujac, and Maison Nicolas Potel. To manage the vineyards he brought on local viticulturist Mimi Casteel. Mimi is the daughter of Ted Casteel and Pat Dudley, co-founders of Bethel Heights Vineyard. She brings with her a lifetime of living and working in the valley and her families well known reputation for Sustainable and Biodynamic farming.

Master Sommelier Larry Stone and Lingua Franca WinesStone was in negotiations with Evening Land’s neighbors to purchase the land adjacent to the famed Seven Springs Vineyard, even before he left the project. After he left Evening Land the Janzen family approached him with a deal to buy the land. He sold his stake in Sirita Winery, auctioned off his personal wine collection and convinced a few friends to invest.

They cleared the land – removing fruit and Christmas Trees – planted a vineyard and built a winery, designed by Lafon and Savre. Across the road from Seven Springs it is also adjacent Domaine Serene’s Jerusalem Hill Vineyard, Argyle Winery’s Lone Star Vineyard and Domaine Drouhin’s Roserock Vineyard.

A perfect vineyard sight, a remarkably capable team and an astute understanding of the wine business. It is not surprising these wines are already creating a buzz. Lingua Franca is being poured at high-profile Paris restaurants Vitus, Taillevent and Spoon. Impressive for a new minted American Pinot Noir.

Master Sommelier Larry Stone and Lingua Franca Wines

The entire first vintage from Lingua Franca received 90 plus point scores from Wine Spectator! With The Tongue N’ Cheek making it in the

Lingua Franca Avni Pinot Noir Eola-Amity Hills 2015 $36.99 btl

Refined and precise, featuring a structure that’s elegantly complex, with raspberry and cinnamon aromas and sleek cherry and mineral flavors. Drink now through 2022. 772 cases made.

92 Points Wine Spectator

He told me, “We are not trying to make ‘burgundy’, although that is of course an influence. We are making wines of very little intervention, wines of place”. Stone describes it as “exploring Oregon with the mind of Burgundy.” The name Lingua Franca represents the concept of universal language, of bringing people of different worlds to common ground – shared conversation, shared enjoyment. Lingua franca could be described as a conversation between Oregon terroir and years of traditional Burgundian winemaking.

If you were to make a list of what you would need to make a great wine, every box would be checked off on the list.

Not bad for the son of refugees.

His mother was a cheesemaker, and his father was a produce buyer at Seattle’s Pike Place Market. Stone was always enamored with food and even making his own wine at age 14. At the UW, Stone was a National Merit Scholar who studied abroad in Montpellier, France, and Vienna. He pursued a doctorate in comparative literature, earning a Fulbright Scholarship to University of Tübingen in Germany.He never finished his dissertation.

He was one of Seattle’s very first Sommeliers’ at a restaurant called the Red Cabbage. Later working at the Four Seasons Olympic before heading to Chicago and Charlie Trotter’s.Master Sommelier Larry Stone and Lingua Franca Wines

Local boy does good, and then some.

 

By Lenny Rede

Leonard Redé is the marketing person here at Esquin Wine and Spirits. An instructor in the Wine Technology Program at South Seattle, he wrote the curriculum for the Associate of Arts Degree in Food and Wine Pairing Sommelier Studies. A classically trained chef and pastry chef he was nominated for educator of the year while Chef Instructor at the world renowned Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. He garnered international attention at his award winning restaurant Sapphire kitchen and bar. A restaurateur, wine steward, chef and educator with over 30 years of industry experience he has a unique blend of culinary and wine expertise. He loves to share his passion for all things gastronomic and he’ll gladly help you navigate the world of wine and is always quick with a wine pairing or recipe.

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Arnie’s Lunch with a Burgundy Legend

It’s not every day that you get to sit down and break bread with a legendary Burgundy producer.

Yet that is precisely what happened when I was invited to lunch recently with Laurent Drouhin of Burgundy’s renowned Maison Joseph Drouhin at Seattle’s Virginia Inn by Pike Place Market.

Founded in Beaune in 1880, Maison Joseph Drouhin’s cellars have spread from the historical Cellars of the Dukes of Burgundy and the Kings of France in Beaune (12th-18th centuries) to the Moulin de Vaudon, an 18th Century watermill in Chablis.

The Joseph Drouhin Domaine was assembled parcel by parcel over the years and comprises today 73 hectares (182.5 acres) of vineyards in Côte de Nuits, Côte de Beaune, Côte Chalonnaise and Chablis. It is one of the most important domains in Burgundy, with more than two thirds of the vineyards classified as Premier and Grand Crus.

Arnie’s Lunch with a Burgundy Legend

 

Laurent Drouhin who, along with his sister Véronique and brothers Frédéric and Philippe, are the latest fourth generation to run the venerable grower and negociant house in the village of Beaune.

Arnie’s Lunch with a Burgundy LegendThe Virginia Inn is a Pike Market institution offering classic French bistro fare so, naturally, I ordered the Boeuf Bourgignon. It arrived at a perfect time because we finished whites and were starting on the reds. It was old school and excellent!

 

 

Laurent guided us through a tasting of 11 wines; 5 white and 6 red:

 

White Wine

2015 Drouhin Vaudon Chablis $21.99

Nice mineral notes result from the region’s poor pebbly soils of Kimmeridgian limestone. Good value here. Fresh apple, lemon and stony flavors that play off the lively acidity. Stays juicy and long on the finish.

2015 Pouilly Vinzelles $19.99

“Clean and focused, this white evokes lemon, oak spice and mineral flavors. Has plenty of tension and builds to a long aftertaste of citrus and mineral.”

90 points Wine Spectator

2015 Chassagne-Montrachet $65.99

“Notes of petrol, resin and essence of pear and white peach can be found on the nicely layered nose. The rich, full-bodied and very generously proportioned medium weight flavors possess lovely mid-palate concentration while delivering good length on the relatively powerful finish. This is not especially complex at present though there is better aging potential here and this may surprise to the upside.” Burghound

 

2015 Meursault $55.99

“A ripe but classic nose of hazelnut and fresh white orchard fruit aromas is trimmed in a hint of matchstick. The rich, full and naturally sweet middle weight flavors also possess fine depth and length for a villages level wine. This is seductively delicious if a bit less energetic but richer and one that should repay 4 to 6 years of cellar time.” Burghound

2015 Drouhin Oregon Roserock Chardonnay $31.99

“Pale yellow-gold. Intense, mineral-inflected orchard and pit fruit, lavender and buttered toast aromas are complicated by oyster shell, fennel and vanilla nuances. Concentrated yet nervy and light on its feet, offering palate-staining, oak-kissed pear nectar, Meyer lemon and candied ginger flavors underscored by a vein of smoky minerality. Shows superb energy and power on the floral-tinged finish, which hangs on with serious, mineral-driven tenacity.”

Josh Raynolds, Vinous

 

Red Wines

 

2015 Chorey-lès-Beaume $27.99

“Bright, full red. Cool aromas of cherry, licorice and menthol. Juicy red berry flavors are accented by a hint of licorice. The tannins are firm but not dry, with the persistent finish displaying attractive perfumed lift. This makes the Rully seem a bit rustic by comparison.” Stephan Tanzer, Vinous

2015 Savigny-lès-Beaune $37.99

This is Chorey’s more muscular brother with richer, darker fruit. Laurent said that they declassify some premier crus here, as they do with other village appellations. 18 months in French oak barriques.

2015 Gevrey Chambertin $61.99

“Captivating aromas and flavors of pure cherry, mineral, tobacco and spice mark this supple red. Beautifully balanced, this remains long on the finish, driven by succulent acidity. Best from 2020 through 2033.” Wine Spectator

 

2011 Beaune Clos de Mouches 1er Cru $114.99

The 2011 Beaune Clos des Mouches impresses for its intensity. Green pears, exotic flowers, mint, citrus and crushed rocks are all very much alive in the glass. The flavors are beautifully defined in a salivating, crystalline wine full of personality. Clos des Mouches remains one of the undiscovered jewels of Burgundy in its price range. The 2011 is likely to enjoy broad drinking window that will last several decades. Antonio Galloni, Vinous

 

2015 Drouhin Oregon Roserock Zéphirine Pinot Noir $31.99

Arnie’s Lunch with a Burgundy Legend“Brilliant red. Vibrant, spice-accented red fruit liqueur, floral pastille and incense aromas, along with an intense mineral topnote. Stains the palate with sweet raspberry and spicecake flavors that show impressive depth as well as delicacy and nervy cut. Silky, seamless and precise, finishing with outstanding energy and velvety, slow-building tannins that harmonize smoothly with the deep fruit.”

Josh Raynolds, Vinous

 

Arnie Millan is Esquin’s European Buyer and Resident Expert on all things Burgundy.

 

 

 

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pFriem Family Brewers

The story of pilsner starts in 19th century Bohemia when a Bavarian monk smuggled a special yeast to a brewmaster in Pilsen. The world’s first blond lager, the original Pilsner Urquell, is still produced there today.


The story of pFriem Pilsner starts in the Pacific Northwest, Josh Pfriem a Seattle native who’s love of beer sent him bicycling around Belgium, concocting batches in a shed in his backyard, tracking down the best brewers around and needling them for information. He spent most of his early years divided between skiing and home brewing. His first real job was at the Utah Brewers Cooperative and he was hooked.

pFriem Family Brewers
He worked at the legendary local Will Kemper’s Chuckanut Brewery before landing at Full Sail in Hood River, OR. While in Hood River he met his future partners, Ken Whiteman and Rudy Kellner and that lead to pFriem Family Brewers. They shared a deep love of family, the Columbia River Gorge and of course, great beer — but more importantly, each brought his own unique skill set to the table, creating the means and vision to not only make great beer, but to operate a great business. In August 2012, pFriem Family Brewers opened its doors for the first time, and the three founders realized the beginning of their unique dream.

pFriem Family Brewers

Today, pFriem is on just about everyone Top list of great PNW Breweries. They stand apart in their crafting of world class Pilsner. Pilsner might be ubiquitous in the macro lane. But, it takes a deft hand and dedication to make great craft Pilsner. Josh Pfriem does just that.
pFriem Pilsner

“Aroma of fresh grass and flowers and a touch of honey. While there are no monks involved in this pilsner, there is still a crisp and spicy finish.”
ABV: 4.9%
IBUs: 38
Served at: 40 – 45° F
Hops: Perle, Saphir, Tettnang, Spalt Select
Malts: Gambrinus & Weyermann German Pilsner, Carafoam, Acidulated

http://www.pfriembeer.com/

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Left Coast Cellars is Walking the Talk: A Model of Authenticity.

In an ever crowded wine world, where brands are created by marketing executives in cubicles, it is always exciting to see, and taste, truly authentic wine. In this increasingly virtual world it is refreshing to see/ taste authenticity.

Left Coast Cellars is Walking the Talk: A Model of Authenticity.Left Coast Cellars is not just an estate winery, it is a fully functioning farm. The 150 acres of vineyards are laid out over a 356-acre estate, along with fruit trees, Oregon oaks, vegetable gardens and bee hives. Ducks, chickens along with wilder fowl rove the estate.
From the hilltop tasting room beyond the stretches of vineyards you can see the Eola Hills and to the north the Amity Hills, the Van Duzer gap. It was here in 2003, the founders Susanne and Robert Pfaff laid out a vision for something a little more than a just a winery or family farm, “building a lasting and enduring legacy for generations to come.”

Left Coast Cellars is Walking the Talk: A Model of Authenticity.
Sustainability is a core value at Left Coast. Certified LIVE and Salmon Safe, ensuring only the best viticultural practices are used in both the vineyards and winery. The winery itself is powered by a solar array and the water for the gravity powered irrigation is generated by the estates own watershed. In addition, Left Coast is a founding member of the Oak Accord, which is a voluntary partnership of private landowners seeking to preserve Oak habitat in the Willamette Valley.

Left Coast Cellars is Walking the Talk: A Model of Authenticity.
The location at the head of the Van Duzer Corridor, an east-west valley that creates a break in the coast range of mountains that shields most of the Willamette Valley from the Pacific Ocean. The break allows for cool marine breezes and fog to roll into the valley in the morning, preserving freshness and acidity in the grapes. The grapes planted include Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Pinot Meunier, Syrah, Viognier and (my favorite) Pinot Blanc.

Left Coast Cellars is Walking the Talk: A Model of Authenticity.Left Coast Cellars is Walking the Talk: A Model of Authenticity.Viticulturist and GM Luke McCollum has been with winery since 2003 is graduate of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and work includes stints at Harlan Estate and Meridian. Winemaker Joe Wright came on board in 2011, but has been working in the Willamette Valley since 1996, with stints at Tualatin, Belle Vallee and Willamette Valley Vineyards.

Lead by matriarch Suzanne Larson, the family works the land with loving care and kindness.

Left Coast Cellars is Walking the Talk: A Model of Authenticity.
When talking about wine, wineries and terroirs, we often speak in terms of generations. It is not uncommon to meet the fifth generation of and French Chateau or the 8th generation of an Italian Villa. Dame Suzanne and her team are building a winery for the generations.

-Lenny

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Yamhill-Carlton Road Show June 27th!

Come Taste the Wine of Oregon’s Yamhill-Carlton AVA!

June 27th, 2017 | 6 to 8pm
The Metropolist
2931 1st Avenue South A
Seattle, WA 98134

$30 (in advance with Eventbrite here>>)
$35.00 (at the door ~ cash only)

The Yamhill-Carlton American Viticultural Area, home of many Oregon wine industry pioneers and the oldest soils in the Willamette Valley, is coming to Seattle! Join 12 wineries for a memorable tasting experience on June 27th from 6-8pm. The producers will be pouring wine all exclusively made from Y-C AVA fruit, concentrating on Pinot Noir, as well as a small selection of other varietals. This is a great opportunity to taste Oregon wines without traveling hundreds of miles. Learn firsthand about Oregon’s geology and climate and what makes the wine so alluring, complex and age worthy. While you sip, enjoy delectable bites that complement these world-class wines.

This is a unique opportunity, as many of these wines are not for sale in Washington state. If you like what you taste at the event & want these wines in your own cellar, Esquin Wine & Spirits will be taking wine orders!

Participating Yamhill-Carton AVA Wineries:

Carlton Hill Wines

Elk Cove Vineyards

Fairsing Vineyards

Ghost Hill Cellars

JL Kiff Vineyard

Ken Wright Cellars

Lenne Estate

Marshall Davis

Monks Gate

Saffron Fields

Stag Hollow

 

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Weekend Wine Pairing – Spinach and Pesto Gnocchi w/ Love & Squalor Sauvignon Blanc

Love & Squalor Sauvignon Blanc is aromatic with hints of passion fruit and guava zesty with lime, gooseberry and green apple but this wine isn’t just about fruit it is a perfect balance of acid and fruit this wine has minerality and a slight savory note. Green herb notes on the palate with a nice clean finish.

The grapes come from two vineyards: Redford-Wetle in the Eola-Amity hills and Aurora Colony Vineyard in Aurora. If there is one last master of white winemaking for Matt to get tutored by it would be Myron Redford of Redford-Wetle Vineyard, founder of Amity Vineyards and white wine evangelist.

This wine is versatile and could pair with many different dishes – shellfish, vegetable dishes, pastas, salads of all kinds. Sauvignon Blanc is one of the few wines that is perfectly suited to foil many tricky ingredients that are notoriously hard to pair like – artichokes, asparagus, green herbs, goat cheese.

Always a favorite the Love & Squalor Sauvignon Blanc really struts it stuff when paired to a dish like Spinach Gnocchi:

Spinach Gnocchi with Pesto

1 pound Roasted potatoes
½ cup Ricotta
4 ounces Spinach, cooked and chopped
¼ teaspoon Nutmeg
2 each Egg Yolks
1 cup Flour or more as needed
1 tsp Salt
Pinch White Pepper
Pesto Sauce
Pecorino Romano for grating

Printable recipe w/ instructions

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Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

Our Champagnes have been consumed and celebrated at the International Pinot Noir Celebration since Bryan first visited in 2011, rolling a cooler around filled with bubbles!

Thibaud Mandet (Winemaker at WillaKenzie), Bryan, Rollin Soles (Winemaker at ROCO Winery)

Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

Pinot Noir from Australia, excellent!

Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

Champagne and sparkling wine fanatics: David Speer (Ambonnay), Rajat Parr (Evening Land, Sandhi Wines, Domaine de la Côte), Bryan

Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

Bryan, Ken Meyer (FC Club Member), Nelson Daquip (Canlis Head Sommelier), Chris Tange (Seattle wine distributor and Master Sommelier)

Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

Bryan, Chris, Carrie (Wine buyer for Sea Creature Restaurants), Renee Erickson (Chef and Owner, Sea Creature Restaurants)

Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

IPNC’s volunteer sommeliers enjoying Fat Cork Champagne with their brunch.

Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

Larry Stone (Master Sommelier, Lingua Franca Wines), Raj, Mimi Castille (Oregon vigneronne and FC Club Member), Bryan

Fat Cork goes to IPNC, 2016

Bryan, Dawn Smith (Sommelier extraordinaire and Fat Cork General Manager)

A tasting of Oregon Pinot Noirs

 

I couldn’t be more pleased with my tasting yesterday, but I don’t give the credit to myself; I give it to the wines. The idea was to taste some of our Oregon Pinot Noirs to a select group of people in Marin County. In many respects, this was the best tasting I ever went to, because it satisfied the requirements of a good comparative wine event. The wines were conceptually linked: all Oregon Pinot Noirs. Seven of the eight wines were current releases, although they weren’t all from the same vintage. The eighth wine was from 2005, but from the same winery and vineyard as one of the current releases, so we could see how these fine Oregon Pinot Noirs age. And there was a ninth “surprise” wine, much older than even the ’05, that I’ll describe shortly.

But the best part of the tasting was the logic of the order of wines. Seldom have I experienced a better gradation from lighter and more accessible to richer and more ageworthy. I didn’t really understand how compelling this spectrum would be until I arrived early to open the wines and taste. It was so obvious, like ascending a ladder or climbing a mountain, as it were. To a wine taster like me, this is glory, this is as good as things get, when the order of a lineup makes perfect sense. It is a thing of beauty.

I started with the lighter wines, of course, worked my way through the more complex ones, and then there was that 2005, so you could see that we don’t only say these great Oregon Pinot Noirs are ageable, we demonstrate it. Here was the order of the lineup, with very brief notes.

La Crema 2014 Willamette Valley. It was what I think of as the La Crema style: broadly appealing, fruity, easy to like, with some complexity. The alcohol was the highest on the table, some 14.5%. It was easy to appreciate (and I say this as a Jackson Family Wines employee, but also as an objective reporter) why these La Crema wines have been so successful in the marketplace.

Siduri 2014 Willamette Valley. There was a definite step up in complexity here, not just fruit but tea, mushrooms, earth notes. Still a wine to drink now.

Siduri 2014 Chehalem Mountains. Even earthier than the Willamette Valley, with oodles with cherries and wild mushrooms. One of the guests, a restaurateur, said he would make a porcini mushroom risotto with this.

Penner-Ash 2014 Estate. So new is JFW’s acquisition of Penner-Ash that not even I have all that much familiarity with it. This is their estate vineyard, formerly known as Dussin Vineyard. It represented an entirely new leap into complexity, starting off a bit closed due to tannins, then erupting into pomegranates, tart cranberries and a wonderfully earthy mushroominess. I would surely age this wine.

Gran Moraine 2013. A new winery from the JFW portfolio, and so complex. It elicited a fierce discussion from our group concerning what to drink it with. Quail, veal, risotto, salmon, steak, take your pick. A mineral-driven wine of great terroir and ageability.

Zena Crown 2013 The Sum. This is another wine that was new to me. Wow, what complexity. Very low alcohol (12.9%), dry, fairly tannic in youth, and mushroomy, with a sassafras and cola taste many of us noted. Lots of acidity, a serious, intellectual, ageworthy wine.

Angela Estate 2012 Abbot Claim. This is not owned by JFW but sold in California by Jackson’s Regal Wine Company. For me it was the top current release, although not the most expensive. Gorgeous perfume, with foresty scents and tons of wild raspberries. At four years, it’s starting to show some age; the bottle was throwing some light sediment.

Penner-Ash 2005 Dussin Vineyard. Showing its age: orange-bricky color at the rim. But so clean and vibrant, with marzipan, cocoa, raspberry tea and spice flavors. It had that “sweet but dry” richness you sometimes get from older wines.

I finished with the surprise wine, the Penner-Ash 1998 Dussin Vineyard. This was a Wow! wine for everybody. At 18 years it was still vital and alert, a wine with nervous energy, plenty of spine, pure, bright and delicious, with sweet fruit and a long finish. Some wines of this age die quickly in the glass. Not this one. I brought it with me afterwards to lunch and it was fabulous.

And speaking of lunch, we had our event at Tamalpie, which calls itself a pizzeria, and it does have fabulous pizza, but also does wonderful Cal-Italian fare. I would eat there all the time if I lived closer to Mill Valley.

Taste Oregon: March 21st

OREGON WINERIES INVADE WASHINGTON

The first ever TASTE OREGON is coming to Seattle Mon. March 21st! 40 wineries spanning the various regions of Oregon’s wine AVA’s will be descending entering the hallowed territory dominated by over 850 Washington wineries.  Industry & media friends will meet the winemakers from the neighboring Northwest wine region to come and try Oregon wines.

Oregon is a world-class wine region itself, with 18 approved wine growing regions, more than 600 wineries and more than 900 vineyards producing 72 varieties of grapes according to the Oregon Wine Board.

The private, industry only event is followed on Monday March 21st in the evening by a general public event from 6-9 pm, tickets are $30 advance and $40 at the door if still available. The event is produced as a collaboration between Seattle Uncorked and City Fruit, an organization that helps urban residents care for their fruit trees and then harvests and distribute what is usually unused fruit to provide assistance to local food banks.

Tickets are now available for the general public session at https://cityfruit.org/calendar/taste-oregon-benefiting-city-fruit and Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/events/911179468995722

Comp. media tickets are available upon request!