Weekend Pairing – Clams and Chorizo and Finn River Farmstead Cider

Cider is quite possibly one of the most underappreciated beverages around. But in that few years there has been nothing short of a revolution in the American Cider industry. I say American, because Europe has a long history of growing great artisanal cider. England, France, Spain all have great cider producing regions, just look to the Basques for culinary inspiration for cooking with cider or Sidra.

America has a long history of producing cider, which in the EU sense I mean hard cider. We all heard the stories of Johnny Appleseed growing up, but what most of us didn’t hear was that Johnny was peddling cider apples, meant for making hard cider. Which makes sense because fermented cider, hard cider was stable and in the times before refrigeration that is what you wanted. With the rise of prohibition the cider industry was virtually destroyed in the US. There have been a number of ciders produced after prohibition but these have been made using second grade dessert apples. Dessert apples are table apples the so called Red Delicious and its kin.
“Up until Prohibition, an apple grown in America was far less likely to be eaten than to wind up in a barrel of cider,” writes Michael Pollan in The Botany of Desire. “In rural areas cider took the place of not only wine and beer but of coffee and tea, juice, and even water.”
Cider apples are a different breed, these apples are bitter and tart and have grown to produce ciders that are complex and interesting.

In the US today there is nothing short of a cider renaissance, with cideries opening up at record numbers. Here in Northwest we are at a center of the action, for decades Washington has been synonymous with apples and with over 175,000 acres of orchards we produce over half the apples in the US.
We are blessed with many great cider producers but a personal favorite is Finnriver. Finnriver Cidery was founded in 2008 by Eric Jorgensen and Keith and Crystie Kisler. The roots of the cidery began in friendship and farmland and now, with several thousand heirloom cider trees in the ground, farming and fermenting continue side by side on 80 acres in Chimacum Valley on the Olympic Peninsula.

Weekend Pairing – Clams and Chorizo and Finn River Farmstead Cider
Finnriver is at the forefront of the craft cider revival and farmcrafts a range of traditional, contemporary and seasonal ciders made primarily from organic Washington fruit, along with a line-up of spirited fruit wines.
Erin James in her new book “Tasting Cider –The Cidercraft Guide to the Distinctive Flavors of North American Hard Cider” she shares a recipe from Chef Paul Zerkel for Clams with Chorizo with Sweet Peas and Leeks. You can pair this with a traditional Basque cider or something local like the Finn River Farmstead Cider.
Weekend Pairing – Clams and Chorizo and Finn River Farmstead Cider“An earthy, amber-colored cider with an aroma of warm bread and sweet apple. Offers a rustic taste of the ripe orchard and hearty homestead cider tradition. Nutty with a sharp acidity that balances a gentle tannic finish. Unfiltered lees lend body to this cider.”

Clams and Chorizo with Sweet Peas and Leeks
Makes 4 servings
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 leek, diced and well rinsed
2 ounces Spanish chorizo, thinly sliced
1 bunch Italian parsley, minced
3 pounds Manila clams, rinsed, scrubbed, and soaked in salt water for 1 hour
1 cup ÆppelTreow Winery & Distillery Appely Doux cider
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
{1/2} cup fresh sweet peas (frozen is optional)
1 baguette, sliced in half lengthwise and buttered

Weekend Pairing – Clams and Chorizo and Finn River Farmstead Cider
1. Preheat the broiler. Set a large pot over medium heat and add the butter. Add the leeks, chorizo, and half of the parsley. Sauté until the leeks are soft and the chorizo is a little crispy, 4 to 5 minutes.
2. Increase the heat to medium-high. Add the clams and stir gently, until they are well coated. Add the cider and season with salt and pepper, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover the pot and let simmer until the clams open, about 5 minutes. Add the peas during the last minute.
3. While the clams are steaming, place the baguette under the broiler and toast until browned, about 2 minutes per side. Pour the clams and broth into a shallow serving bowl. Garnish with the remaining parsley, slice the bread, and serve hot.
Courtesy Erin James “Tasting Cider”

Join us for an evening of Cider and Pairing With Erin James September 6th

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