Go Forth, And Grill! (Talking Wine And BBQ For Fix.com)

image: fix.com

With warmer weather finally upon us in the Northern Hemisphere, my latest for Fix.com (“Grilling and Grapes“) focuses on what wine grapes to keep in mind when you’re firing up the grill.

Wine-and-seasonal-food-stuff-pairing articles are nearly as annoyingly omnipresent as drink-rose-in-the-Springtime articles these days, but because this is my writing that we’re talking about here, you know that I snuck in some slightly off-the-well-trodden-path options.

As always, the Fix.com folks have provided appealing, immediately-digestible visual awesomeness that far exceeds what my words are able to achieve (see below for kick-ass evidence).

Get thee to the wine shop, and then get thee to thy grill!

Cheers!

Go Forth, And Grill! (Talking Wine And BBQ For Fix.com)
Source: Fix.com Blog

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at Go Forth, And Grill! (Talking Wine And BBQ For Fix.com) from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Drinking A Mean Game When Serving Game (Wine Food Pairing Up-leveling For Thrillist.com)

image: thrillist.com

My latest for Thrillist.com is now available, titled How to Level Up Food and Wine Pairings.

Is there anything new regarding food and wine matching offered in this piece? Probably not; just about everything that need be said about pairing up food and wine has pretty much been said.

Having said that, the article is chock-full of the tips and tricks that I myself have actually employed over the years when trying to elevate my own food+wine game, so I’m confident that it will be useful to the Thrillist readership (hell, even if casual wine drinkers remember only the very first tip on the list, they’ll have walked away from a hopefully entertaining read with a culinary rule-of-thumb that’ll improve almost any future wine-pairing attempt that they might make).

Anyway, feel free to stop by at heckle me!

Cheers!

Grab The 1WineDude.com Tasting Guide and start getting more out of every glass of wine today!

Shop Wine Products at Amazon.com

Copyright © 2016. Originally at Drinking A Mean Game When Serving Game (Wine Food Pairing Up-leveling For Thrillist.com) from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Putting wine into a greater context

 

When educators talk about wine at the kinds of consumer events I’m doing this week at Karisma Resort, it seems to me that more than just the hedonistic and technical aspects of the wines should be discussed.

I mean, wine is more than just “cherries” or “limes” and bright acidity or steak-worthy tannins and an AVA. Yes, those kinds of things—its flavors and textures, it’s varietal mix, its appellation—are important, and consumers want and need to know about them. After all, the reason why folks pay to go to these sorts of events is because they’re hungry for more knowledge about wine (and bless them for that!).

But there’s so much more to wine. For example, it’s important for people who are tasting wines from the company I work for, Jackson Family Wines, to understand things like the Jacksons’ commitment to sustainability. It’s one thing to talk about (for instance) Stonestreet Christopher’s Cabernet Sauvignon, but that wine needs to be put into the context of the fact that Jess loved that mountain so much, he’s buried there, his wife, Barbara, lives there, and “Christopher” is the name of their only son. It helps consumers to know about (and I think it’s terribly interesting in itself) how Jess left corridors of pathways open throughout the vastness of the Alexander Mountain Estate, to let the critters who have lived there forever—cougars, bears, deer, wild boars and so on—prowl. These things may not have anything to do with the wine’s flavors, or how it ages, or the way it pairs with steak. But in a funny way, they do. It places the wine into a greater context, one you can call “intellectual” and “emotional” rather than (merely) hedonistic; and it’s in the brain—the seat of intellect and emotions—that wine’s greatest appeal lives.

This putting-wine-into-greater-contexts presents more of a challenge to educators. They have to do more research than to just read a tech sheet and regurgitate it to whatever audience they’re addressing—which is something I’ve seen far too much of (and something I admit to being occasionally guilty of myself). But, after all, in this day-and-age of “the story,” when we’re told that every wine needs something to distinguish itself from every other wine, it does behoove us educators to go beyond the routine and really find out what makes that wine that wine. Especially when the story connected to it is compelling.

Back tomorrow, reporting from this delightful part of the Maya Riviera.