8 Of Our Favorite Rose Wines Under $25

These pinks are easy going down and easy on the wallet.

When it comes to warm-weather drinking, rose is the new go-to. In 2015, the volume of rose sales was up more than 44% year over year. With rose being such a popular wine we thought we’d give you our recommendations for some amazing rose that won’t break the bank. These rose wines vary in hue from a pale blush too vibrant salmon, from the Provence region of France to Horse Heaven Hills in Washington.

  1. Baron De Funes Rosado 2017: Made from 100% Garnacha, this is a lean pink wine loaded with cut strawberry and fresh mint accents. For under $10, this wine is a tasty, screaming deal. https://madwine.com/rose/92761-baron-de-funes-rosado-2017.html $6.99
  2. Regaleali Rosato 2017: Thousands of roses, brought in from all over the world, thrive on the Regaleali estate. The name of this wine has changed to reflect these incredible flowers. Unchanged, however, are the Nerello Mascalese grapes which give Le Rose di Regaleali its class and elegant fragrance. Deep salmon-pink in color, offers delicate aromas of cherry, raspberry, blackberry, and-appropriate to its name-rose petals. Rich on the palate with refreshing acidity and a long, flavorful finish, this is what Sicilians enjoy in the summertime. Perfect for tuna, salmon, poultry, pork, and flavorful pasta dishes, this wine is universally food-friendly. https://madwine.com/rose/92801-regaleali-rosato-2017.html $9.99
  3. Michel Lynch Rose 2017: Candy pink in color, this is a soft wine. Its caramel and spice are balanced with the red-currant fruits to give an easy, open wine that is ready to drink. https://madwine.com/rose/92794-michel-lynch-rose-2017.html $10.99
  4. Librandi Circo Rosato 2017: The vineyards that dot the countryside of the small town of Ciro Marina overlook the Ionian Sea and benefit from cool ocean breezes, thus producing grapes with spicy and floral aromas. Ciro Rosato is made from 100% Gaglioppo, Calabria’s signature variety, selectively harvested in late September into early October. https://madwine.com/rose/92791-librandi-ciirco-rose-2017.html $11.99
  5. Commanderie de la Bargemone Coteaux D’Aix en Provence Rose 2017: Bargemone is among the foremost estates of the Coteaux d’Aix appellation of Provence. A benchmark producer of the delicious, dry rose for which Provence is famous. Offers classic aromas of wild strawberries and red currants, with a light, floral character and a crisp, bone dry palate. https://madwine.com/rose/86770-commanderie-de-la-bargemone-coteaux-d-aix-en-provence-rose-aoc-2016.html $14.99
  6. AIX Rose 2017: This is a smooth, beautifully ripe wine. It is well balanced, with crisp red and orange fruits adding a refreshing background to the spice and acidity. This finely made wine is ready to drink. https://madwine.com/rose/91742-aix-rose-2016.html $17.99
  7. Whispering Angel Rose 2017: The Rose that put Provence on the map! Very French in style, loads of minerality, light peach, fresh strawberries, and a hint of rosewater. The bright acid makes this the perfect rose to pair with grilled Sea Scallops wrapped in fresh watermelon. Perfect for that patio dinner. 91 POINTS DECANTER. https://madwine.com/rose/92798-whispering-angel-rose-2017.html $19.99
  8. Julia’s Dazzle Rose 2016: Though the highest price on this list, this unique Rose of Pinot Gris is named after Allen’s granddaughter, Julia, and is sourced from a special block from The Benches Vineyard at Wallula in Horse Heaven Hills. The grapes were left to hang until they developed a bright tint, then gently pressed and the clarified juice slowly fermented at cool temperatures to retain the wine’s intensely vibrant aromatics and flavors. Fresh and lively with bright aromas and flavors of ripe strawberries and melon complimented by a racy acidity that lingers across a clean, off dry finish. https://madwine.com/rose/90492-julia-s-dazzle-rose-2016.html $22.99

 

Cheers!

8 Of Our Favorite Rose Wines Under $25

The post 8 Of Our Favorite Rose Wines Under $25 appeared first on Madewine's Sippy Cup - Blog.

Hungary Royal Tokaji

The other week, a small group of wine pros met at Wild Ginger to taste through an exquisite line-up of Hungary’ Royal Tokaji. Tokaji (formerly Tokay) is one of the world’s greatest dessert wines and our tasting more than lived up to expectations!

Our guide was Kimberly Bowden, CSW, CSS (those initials mean she knows her topic) from Wilson Daniels, the importer of Royal Tokaji.

Tokaji’s wines were renowned throughout Europe – among nobility, Czars, and clergy – 400 to 500 years ago. Tokaji was also the first wine region in Europe to be classified.in 1700. Prince Rakoczi initiated the world’s first classification of a wine region by Great First Growth, First Growth, Second Growth and Third Growth.

There are 3 grape varieties permitted in production of Tokaji:

  • Furmint, 70% of plantings, very high levels of tartaric acid, very susceptible to Botrytis
  • Hárslevelú, 25% of plantings, rich in sugars and aromas
  • Muscat de Lunel, 5% of plantings, difficult to grow but important seasoning

The Tisza and Bodrogm rivers create a mist similar to the fog in Sauternes, which encourages development of botrytis cinerea and potentially, noble rot, under the right conditions.

Royal Tokaji uses indigenous yeasts and grapes, traditional winemaking methods and ages wines in a 13th century underground cellar. They hand-harvest non-Botrytis bunches to ferment into dry base wine in stainless steel. About three weeks later, they hand-harvest harvest shriveled aszú berries berry by berry then grind the berries into a paste and add it to the partially fermented base wine. After stirring for two or more days, the wine is transferred to gönci, 140-liter or 37-gallon barrels and moved to the 13th century cellar for the second fermentation which may take a few months to a few years due to high sugar levels and cool cellars. The wine is so rare because each vine yields one glass of wine.

Royal Tokaji is one of the region’s elite producers with holdings in all of the region’s top crus. It was founded by British wine authority Hugh Johnson, among other investors, in 1990 after the fall of communism.

We were lucky to taste these rare wines. They are sensational and complex with notes of blood orange, citrus peel. As the Wine Advocate’s Neal Martin writes, “The delineation is astonishing on the nose, unfurling with entrancing scents of orange blossom, freshly sliced apricots, almond, and quince – all beautifully focused.” I might add, on the palate, stewed mandarin orange, honey, and quince. In addition to sweeter wines, we tasted a terrific, crisp dry Furmint and an elegant, mildly sweet late harvest Tokaji.

The post Hungary Royal Tokaji appeared first on Madewine's Sippy Cup - Blog.

Mark Ryan Winery: The Vincent Rosé Release

Board Track Racer Releases The Vincent Rosé

From Mark Ryan Winery

 

SEATTLE, March 26, 2018 — Board Track Racer announces the release of The Vincent Rosé. The 2017 vintage boasts 60% Merlot, 18% Syrah, 13% Cab Franc, 7% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 2% Grenache and is made using the Saignée method.

The Vincent Rosé offers delightful citrus and floral aromas that mirror on the palate. Soft fruit flavors include cranberries, salmon berries, melon, and pear. Bright acidity and honeysuckle combine and linger on the finish. This wine screams summer!

Production of The Vincent Rosé is limited. It is currently available at the Board Track Racer tasting room, Mark Ryan tasting rooms in Woodinville and Walla Walla, as well as select wholesale shops, and online at www.markryanwinery.com.

 

Board Track Racer Tasting Room

19501 144th Ave F-900  

Woodinville, WA 98072

425.415.3865

 

Mark Ryan Tasting Room, Woodinville

14475 Woodinville-Redmond Road

Woodinville, WA 98072

425.415.3865

 

Mark Ryan Tasting Room, Walla Walla

26 E. Main Street, Suite 1

Walla Walla, WA 99362

509.876.4577

 

Board Track Racer, one of Mark Ryan Winery’s sister projects, produced its first vintage in 2008 and is named for the wild wood track motorcycle races of the 1920s. The labels for all the wines are inspired by the same era, with great motorcycle-centric graphics—owner and winemaker, Mark McNeilly is a big fan of vintage motorcycles and the freewheeling spirit they convey.

 

Opened in February 2018, the Board Track Racer tasting room is located at 19501 144th Ave F-900 in Woodinville’s Warehouse District. The tasting room is open Saturday and Sunday from 12pm – 6pm, pouring tastes of the Board Track Racer wines, as well as select bottles from both Megan Anne Cellars and Mark Ryan Winery. For more information, call 425.415.3865.

 

Established in 1999 by Mark Ryan McNeilly, Mark Ryan Winery is an acclaimed Washington winery based in Woodinville, just north of Seattle. A largely self-taught winemaker, the first vintages were crushed and produced in garages of friends and family—in the years since, the winery has grown in size, earning respect and acclaim from wine lovers and critics alike along the way. The goal has always been to make delicious wines that stand as true representations of the vineyard from which they come. For more information, visit www.markryanwinery.com.

 

 

###

 

 

 

 



 
 
Kirsten Graham
kgpr
206.890.3435
kirsten@kirstengrahampr.com
www.kirstengrahampr.com
Twitter @kgpr

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

I had the good fortune last week to be invited to lunch with Bertrand Sourdais, the dynamic 5th generation winemaker and owner of Domaine de Pallus in Chinon, smack dab in the middle of the Loire Valley. He pulls double duty as a partner and winemaker of two wineries in Spain’s Ribero del Duero region.

Bertrand Sourdais

“Thrilling, brilliant” are adjectives that have applied to the wines crafted by Bertrand Sourdais. Although his family estate is in Chinon in the Loire Valley, he made his international reputation with a Spanish wine, the 2002 Dominio de Atauta “Llanos del Almendro,” from Spain’s Ribera del Duero. In a celebrated blind tasting organized by two Europe’s most respected wine critics, Bertrand’s 2002 Atauta tied with the 1994 Vega Sicilia’s Unico, beating out the 2000 Château Latour; this was a shocking result as it was Bertrand’s first commercial vintage as winemaker.

Check out this Video of the vineyards!

Just after graduating from Enology school in Bordeaux, Bertrand apprenticed at Mouton-Rothschild, Santa Rita in Chile and Alvaro Palacios in Priorat. Bertrand took his first post as winemaker at Atauta in Ribero del Duero. After he left Atauta, Bertrand started Bodegas Antidoto and Dominio de ES, both in Ribera del Duero.

At lunch, Bertrand revealed that he was fired by the new owners of Atauta back in 2008. Even though he did not elaborate, the firing must have been a dramatic turning point in his life and, thirteen years on, you can still see it in his eyes. It still hurts. Yet I believe that the firing ignited a passionate determination to work only for himself with a fierce drive to succeed.

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus
ANTIDOTO RIBERA DEL DUERO 2014 92 WA

So he founded a new winery, with partner David Hernando, an agronomist, called Antidoto. Antidoto means antidote and it was just the perfect cure for Bertrand’s Atauta blues. It was no coincidence that they located Antidoto in the Soto de San Esteban zone in the Soria province, just a stone’s throw from Atauta!

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus
Duero Vines

At the same time, Bertrand’s father wanted to retire and to turn the estate in Chinon over to Bertrand. Bertrand was eager to take the reins of his family estate in addition to his commitment in Ribera del Duero. Bertrand told me he drives 8 hours each way from Pallus to Antidoto and back. That determined dedication is impressive and I think it is fueled by his traumatic firing from Atauta nearly ten years ago. Those wounds are still raw to this day.

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

Chinon is a prestigious appellation, mostly for Cabernet Franc, located in the center of the Loire Valley. It produces some of France’s meatiest Cabernet Francs which are sometimes compared to Bordeaux. As this is Bertrand’s home, his family estate, Domaine de Pallus, takes pride of place over his Spanish estates.

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

Bertrand farms his vineyards organically, using biodynamic treatments. Yields are kept low, sometimes too low (under 1 ton/acre!).

Below are the wines we tasted with Bertrand.Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

Pallus 2014 Les Pensées de Pallus: Les Pensées boasts a dark ruby color with aromas of dried herbs, anise and rosemary. On the palate, there is medium-to-full bodied fruit of tart black plum, black currant, black tea and bright acidity leading to a vibrant mineral finish. In stock at Esquin.

We also tasted, for the first time:

Pallus 2016 Les Messanges: Bertrand’s entry level Chinon, the. This is delightful fruity wine of elegance and balance. Available soon.

Antidoto 2015 Ribera del Duero: this is 100% Tinto Fino (Tempranillo) produced from grapes from the Soto de San Esteban zone in the Soria province, the cooler part of Ribera del Duero. Just released, this is a serious wine that can age. Available soon.

Pallus 2017 Messanges Chinon Rosé: A dry, crisp Cabernet Franc rosé perfect for Spring and Summer drinking. Fire up the outdoor grill! Available soon.

Antidoto 2017 Roselito Ribera del Duero: This complex Rosé is produced from 80% Tinto Fino and 20% Albillo Mayor, a little known local white grape indigenous to Ribera del Duero. Available soon.

Click for a Fact Sheet with more information on Bertrand Sourdais

arnie@esquin.com

The post Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus appeared first on Madewine's Sippy Cup - Blog.

Kiona – OG Red Mountain

“Red Moutain has established itself as not only Washington’s premier wine-growing region, but one of the finest in the world.”
“Red Mountain has established itself as not only Washington’s premier wine-growing region, but one of the finest in the world.”
— SEAN SULLIVAN, WINE ENTHUSIAST MAGAZINE

Red Mountain has made its name by growing some of the best Cabernet in the state. Now, many other grapes are grown here but many of the most highly regarded bottlings in the state are sourced in part or exclusively from here. The highest scoring Cabernet from Washington in Wine Spectator came from Ciel du Cheval, the 2007 Grand Reve Collaboration  (97 pts).

The Wine Advocate just gave the 2014 Quilceda Galitzine Vineyard a perfect 100 pt Score! “The utterly spellbinding 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon Galitzine Vineyard is 100% Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon that was brought up in new barrels. Bravo to the team at Quilceda! This is a sensational vintage from Quilceda’s Paul and Alex Golitzin! Both the classic Columbia Valley Cabernet and the Galitzine Vineyard are sheer perfection.” Jeb Dunnick

Click here to take a tour of Red Mountain AVA

Kiona – OG Red Mountain

The Red Mountain AVA is located on a southwest-facing slope in south central Washington, a little more three hours from Seattle.  At just over 4000 acres it is the smallest wine-grape growing region in Washington.  I always tell people that it feels more like a neighborhood than an appellation. Even for Columbia Valley it has a unique combination of diverse geology, gentle south slope, consistent winds and happens to be the warmest spot in the state for grapes.

Kiona – OG Red Mountain
But, years ago (1972), two men, John Williams and Jim Holmes, pioneered grape growing in the area. Everyone thought they were crazy. Even the engineer they hired to dig the well thought they were a couple of crazy “boys”. In 1975 they planted grapes. “It was a good spot, and best of all, we could afford It.” says John Williams. Eventually they would plant another vineyard, Ciel du Cheval (see above), the partnership ended in 1994 very amicably both families remain friends to this day and both went on to great things.

Kiona – OG Red Mountain
The first Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon fruit was sold to Preston. Winemaker is Rob Griffin, now of Barnard Griffin Winery. “The conventional wisdom in the late 1970’s was that Washington was a first class white wine region with limited prospects for reds. My opinion on this point was permanently changed in 1978 with the opportunity to crush the first crop from Kiona Vineyard on Red Mountain. The depth of color and fruit intensity was definitely a revelation as to the potential for Washington Merlots and Cabernets. The fruit yielded wines of tremendous depth and intensity, real diamonds in the rough and a foreshadow of great things to come.” – Rob Griffin.

“For decades the Williams family has been farming classic varieties on Red Mountain, one of America’s great AVAs. They know the land like few others do, and their grapes reflect it.” Bob Betz, Master of Wine

Kiona – OG Red Mountain
Kiona is a family farm. Today, the third generation works the farm and makes the wine. They sell to the best wineries in the state and keep some of the best fruit for themselves. Today, all the land that can be planted with grapes is. But, one of the benefits in being the first to plant is that they can produce truly world class wine that is remarkably affordable.

Kiona – OG Red Mountain

Kiona – OG Red MountainExhibit A:
Kiona Estates Cuvee 2014
A new wine from some of the oldest grapes on Red Mountain (plus some Columbia Valley fruit). The Columbia Valley components bring acid, fruit, and drinkability, while the Red Mountain additions contribute depth, structure, and color. This is a terrific blend of Estate fruit, primarily Cabernet and Merlot with a little Syrah thrown in for good measure. This wine packs serious punch for the price! Holds up to wines twice or even three times the price!

Vineyards: 34% Vista, 23% Nine Canyon, 17% Emory, 15% Kiona Estate, 7% Heart of the Hill, 4% Ranch at the End of the Road
Composition: 38% Cabernet Sauvignon, 37% Merlot, 21% Syrah, 4% Mourvèdre.

Now you can spend more money if you want to.  But a wine of this provenance is rarely seen at this price point.

The post Kiona – OG Red Mountain appeared first on Madewine's Sippy Cup - Blog.

What Five Wine Questions Would You Ask Me?

One of the many things I love about what I do on the internet, in print, and face-to-face? Answer wine questions! Bring. Them. On.

Sure, I enjoy hobnobbing with my industry pals/geeks and getting really esoteric. But I also delight in fielding queries from people outside of the industry. I dig enthusiastic wine drinkers who really challenge and stretch my knowledge by asking “real-world” questions. (Note to my grape brethren: you are not fake. Your words are valued. I just don’t engage in a lot of talk about malolactic fermentation, etc. with my mom and her pals.)

Speaking of non-wine industry people, one person I count among that group is my girlfriend, Emily. I enjoy talking about wine with her and, even more, drinking it in her company. So I thought, why not for my next Snacky Tunes segment, I turn over the reins to her? Find out what wine questions she has for me?

I didn’t know what I would be quizzed on in advance and, with only five minutes, there was no time to dilly-dally with my answers.

Here’s what she ended up asking me, and I’m going to give you some clues, too:

  • What is the weirdest wine you’ve ever had? (Drank it in Grinnell, IA.)
  • What is your desert island wine? (Something sparkling.)
  • What’s the most interesting grape? (Picked a white.)
  • Is there food that does not go with wine? (Yes. It’s sweet and beloved. But I don’t like to be a jerk/killjoy about this stuff.)
  • Are there wines you have to learn to like? (Yes. Sort of like learning to like Brussels sprouts.)

Anyway, listen to the show. My segment’s at the 40:19 mark, but please enjoy the whole thing. And subscribe! It’s a great podcast.

Also on this episode:

  • Gillian Zettler, Executive Director of the Charleston Wine and Food Festival. (BTW, I went to Charleston for the first time over Christmas and loved it.)
  • Fruit & Flowers. Per hosts Darin and Greg: A lady-led post-punk, psych rock quartet that’s one of the hardest-working bands in the Big Apple.

Remember the time I answered wine questions from Nashville musicians?

Question mark graffiti photo by artjouer street art via flickr.

The post What Five Wine Questions Would You Ask Me? appeared first on Jameson Fink.

What Five Wine Questions Would You Ask Me?

One of the many things I love about what I do on the internet, in print, and face-to-face? Answer wine questions! Bring. Them. On.

Sure, I enjoy hobnobbing with my industry pals/geeks and getting really esoteric. But I also delight in fielding queries from people outside of the industry. I dig enthusiastic wine drinkers who really challenge and stretch my knowledge by asking “real-world” questions. (Note to my grape brethren: you are not fake. Your words are valued. I just don’t engage in a lot of talk about malolactic fermentation, etc. with my mom and her pals.)

Speaking of non-wine industry people, one person I count among that group is my girlfriend, Emily. I enjoy talking about wine with her and, even more, drinking it in her company. So I thought, why not for my next Snacky Tunes segment, I turn over the reins to her? Find out what wine questions she has for me?

I didn’t know what I would be quizzed on in advance and, with only five minutes, there was no time to dilly-dally with my answers.

Here’s what she ended up asking me, and I’m going to give you some clues, too:

  • What is the weirdest wine you’ve ever had? (Drank it in Grinnell, IA.)
  • What is your desert island wine? (Something sparkling.)
  • What’s the most interesting grape? (Picked a white.)
  • Is there food that does not go with wine? (Yes. It’s sweet and beloved. But I don’t like to be a jerk/killjoy about this stuff.)
  • Are there wines you have to learn to like? (Yes. Sort of like learning to like Brussels sprouts.)

Anyway, listen to the show. My segment’s at the 40:19 mark, but please enjoy the whole thing. And subscribe! It’s a great podcast.

Also on this episode:

  • Gillian Zettler, Executive Director of the Charleston Wine and Food Festival. (BTW, I went to Charleston for the first time over Christmas and loved it.)
  • Fruit & Flowers. Per hosts Darin and Greg: A lady-led post-punk, psych rock quartet that’s one of the hardest-working bands in the Big Apple.

Question mark graffiti photo by artjouer street art via flickr.

The post What Five Wine Questions Would You Ask Me? appeared first on Jameson Fink.

Woodinville: Board Track Racer Tasting Room

 

Board Track Racer Tasting Room Coming to Woodinville

From Mark Ryan Winery

SEATTLE, February 1, 2018 — Mark McNeilly is excited to announce that he’s opening a new tasting room in Woodinville, this time dedicated to his Board Track Racer line of Washington wines. Located at 19501 144th Ave F-900 in Woodinville’s Warehouse District, the tasting room will open its doors on Saturday, February 24 at 12pm.

Board Track Racer Cellars, one of Mark Ryan Winery’s sister projects, produced its first vintage in 2008 and is named for the wild wood track motorcycle races of the 1920s. The labels for all the wines are inspired by the same era, with great motorcycle-centric graphics—McNeilly is a big fan of vintage motorcycles and the freewheeling spirit they convey. 

 

The current Board Track Racer wines are:

The Vincent Red (Columbia Valley Blend)

The Vincent White (Chardonnay)

The Chief (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Petit Verdot)

The Shift (Syrah, Mourvedre)

 

With inviting gray walls, blond wood, and a communal table for 12, the Board Track Racer tasting room will have a relaxed, motorcycle and rock-n-roll vibe, like the Mark Ryan tasting room. The space has a glass garage door that will offer guests a peek into barrel storage that is shared with neighboring wineries. Capacity is about 85 making the tasting a great option for private events too. 

“The Board Track Racers wines are wonderfully accessible both in taste and price point,” says McNeilly. “I’m thrilled to have a second Woodinville venue to share the wines!”

The tasting room will be open Saturdays and Sundays from 12pm – 6pm, pouring tastes of the Board Track Racer wines, as well as select bottles from both Megan Anne Cellars and Mark Ryan Winery on rotation. For more information, call 425.481.7070. 

Established in 1999 by Mark Ryan McNeilly, Mark Ryan Winery is an acclaimed Washington winery based in Woodinville, just north of Seattle. A largely self-taught winemaker, the first vintages were crushed and produced in garages of friends and family—in the years since, the winery has grown in size, earning respect and acclaim from wine lovers and critics alike along the way. The goal has always been to make delicious wines that stand as true representations of the vineyard from which they come. For more information, visit www.markryanwinery.com.

 
 

###

Wine Resolutions and Goals for 2018

Kicking off 2018 by sharing my wine resolutions. Since I don’t have a whole lotta fitness goals (insert “fittin’ this” donut/pizza/burrito in my mouth joke), I’ll focus on my vocation and passion.

You’ll find promises (to myself and, well, to you) on the latest episode of Snacky Tunes. I’m back! I’d love for you to listen (and don’t want to spoil the high drama/anticipation) but one of my resolutions involves a confession.

Here it is.

I don’t drink a lot of red wine. I probably drink 95% white, rosé, and sparkling. I really only have red when I’m eating or out of the other three flavors.

Let me be clear: I love red wine. Some of my all-time favorite bottles are red. I also like refreshment and that’s what I get from a well-chilled bottle of white or pink wine. (And lighter reds, it must be said.)

Anyway, I’m trying to branch out, be even more curious, and add more red to my repertoire. Rediscover the classics.

Wine Resolutions on Snacky Tunes

Do you have any #winegoals for 2018? Let me know in the comments.

“GOALS” by urban_data via Flickr.

The post Wine Resolutions and Goals for 2018 appeared first on Jameson Fink.

Wine Resolutions and Goals for 2018

Kicking of 2018 by sharing my wine resolutions. Since I don’t have a whole lotta fitness goals (insert “fittin’ this” donut/pizza/burrito in my mouth joke), I’ll focus on my vocation and passion.

You’ll find promises (to myself and, well, to you) on the latest episode of Snacky Tunes. I’m back! I’d love for you to listen (and don’t want to spoil the high drama/anticipation) but one of my resolutions involves a confession.

Here it is.

I don’t drink a lot of red wine. I probably drink 95% white, rosé, and sparkling. I really only have red when I’m eating or out of the other three flavors.

Let me be clear: I love red wine. Some of my all-time favorite bottles are red. I also like refreshment and that’s what I get from a well-chilled bottle of white or pink wine. (And lighter reds, it must be said.)

Anyway, I’m trying to branch out, be even more curious, and add more red to my repertoire. Rediscover the classics.

Wine Resolutions on Snacky Tunes

Do you have any #winegoals for 2018? Let me know in the comments.

“GOALS” by urban_data via Flickr.

The post Wine Resolutions and Goals for 2018 appeared first on Jameson Fink.