Daily Wine News: Supreme Court Hearing

In Wine-Searcher, W. Blake Gray presents a digest of the issues surrounding the landmark Supreme Court hearing.

Brandy Winer founders Ed and Deb Fitts have sold their winery and 15 acres of vines on Pritchard Hill to Jim Bean and Christine O’Sullivan, reports Mitch Frank in Wine Spectator. Winemaker Philippe Melka will stay.

Esther Mobley reviews natural wine bar Verjus in the San Francisco Chronicle. “Is this cave de manger-inspired creation becoming a Bay Area trend, then? Maybe… Or maybe this cave de manger-style situation is just perfectly suited to the style of wine that everyone suddenly seems to be drinking — the style, if not precisely natural then in the natural vernacular, in which Verjus is specializing. The chillable, the chuggable, the crunchy.”

Mike Dunne checks in on Idaho’s growing wine scene in the Sacramento Bee. “Despite Idaho’s agricultural bounty, just 1,300 acres are planted to wine grapes, but that’s double what it was 20 years ago. Of that total, 1,125 acres are cultivated in the Snake River Valley in the state’s southwest corner. Still to be determined is what grape variety or varieties eventually will be most closely identified with Idaho.”

Premium Port sales are rising in the US market, says Jim Clarke in Meininger’s. He goes hunting for the reason why.

In SevenFifty Daily, ­­Courtney Schiessl looks at how Vias Imports built a business on native Italian grapes.

The French insurance company MAIF is leaving the wine industry and selling Château Dauzac, the 1855-classified Grand Cru Classé Margaux with its 49 hectares of bearing vines, according to Vitisphere.

Wine News: What I’m Reading the week of 1/13/19


Welcome to my weekly roundup of the wine stories that I find of interest on the web. I post them to my magazine on on Flipboard, but for those of you who aren't Flipboard inclined, here's everything I've strained out of the wine-related muck for the week.


Meet the Women Pioneering Idaho Wine
Nice profiles.

Defining Japan's Terroir
New rules and regulations.

Redefining Wine Shop Design, Inside and Out
Some of the best, profiled.

Look To The Douro For High Quality Bordeaux Style Wines
Michelle Williams goes to Portugal

Is Royal Tokaji's Essencia the Most Luxurious Wine in the World?
Just ask your mouth.

10 Best Wine Travel Destinations for 2019
Says Wine Enthusiast.

Wine's Most Inspiring People 2019: Apostle of the American Dream in Wine Country
A dream made real.

Measure C Aftermath Divides Napa Residents
Why they invented the word rancor.

Turning the Tables on Fred Swan
An interview with the man himself.

'A wine list that is only a list of wine, sucks'
So, true.

The fundamental problem with wine scores
From a data perspective.

What happens when a casual wine drinker sits in on the Chronicle's esteemed wine tasting panel?
Fun day in the life article.

Wine trends to watch in 2019
Decanter on trends.

A bleak future for new wine apps
Robert Joseph has it right.

Napa County hits The Prisoner winery with code violation notice
A perfect illustration of the idiocy of the current regulations. Selling ART!?! Gasp.

Will the U.S. Supreme Court Upend Wine Laws Across the Nation?
The courtroom spectator.

The Port turnaround
Back in fashion.

The Growing Thirst for Exotic Wine
Life's too short to just drink Cab.

The Human Cost of Supreme Court Ruling
Personal details in the upcoming case.

The Rise of Blaufränkisch Wine
Yes!!!!!!!

Mornington - the two-trick pony
But what tricks they are.

Fine wine can be white too
Ageworthy whites.

Italian Lawmakers Bust Prosecco Producers
Too much sugar.

Now that cheap chardonnay is everywhere, some French winemakers attempt a reinvention
Jon Bonné in the Washington Post on Gamay in the Maconnais

Is there truth in (wine) numbers?
Or any numbers for that matter?

Refining Wine
Ag science in Oregon

The 52 California Wineries You Need to Visit in 2019
Call it a spit bucket list.

Wine's Most Inspiring People 2019: Oregon's Wine Culture Disruptor
Wine in a can from this man.

Al Gore to address wine and climate change conference
Heavy hitters coming to talk wine.

25% of Canadians Mistakenly Drink Red Wine for the Probiotics
Lots of good reasons, but this ain't one.

Inside podcasting, a new tool in wine communication
Or... inside one wine podcast. A shame she doesn't mention others.

How a Harvest Internship Can Benefit Your Career
Well, maybe not all careers.

Why Do We Blame Women For Prohibition?
Wasn't aware that we did. Great article.

Duclot - out of the shadows
Back story of a back-room negociant.

The Supreme Court May Change the Way You Buy Wine
Eric Asimov on the Tennessee v. Blair case.

The quest to save SF's Arab-owned corner stores, one bottle of arak at a time
Yes, there's wine in this story.

Just a few drinks can change how memories are formed
Fascinating how little we know about the brain.

New Year's Resolutions from 7 Industry Leaders
Beck Hopkins talks to folks.



Debuts & Discoveries

March 16, 2019 (Sat): Join us for this 12th Annual event where enthusiasts get to discover and taste all things NEW: New releases from your local favorites as well as Debuts from the newest NW Wineries, Distilleries, Cideries, & Breweries! The popular “Debuts and Discoveries” is being he[...]

Cabernet Classic

March 2, 2019 (Sat): Join us for our 9th Annual event featuring the class act & king of the grapes, The Cabernet Classic! This prestigious event is located at the new Porsche Bellevue! Dress Up for this swanky affair and enjoy free Butler Valet service too! The event helps raise funds for one of the[...]

Wine spills onto the docket at the Supreme Court


On Wednesday, the eyes of wine geeks and those in the wine industry will turn to the the Supreme Court. Wine will be on the docket, and, as you might expect, reds and whites do not map on to a political right and left. A love of wine is non-partisan even though no justice has ever proclaimed “I love wine” during confirmation hearings (only beer gets this kind of admiration!). At stake on Wednesday is whether wine shops can ship across state lines.

The biggest wine case the Supreme Court ever decided was Granholm v Heald in 2005. In their decision, the majority ruled that states could not discriminate between out-of-state wineries and in-state wineries—either they had to open up to shipping from all wineries or close the whole thing down. Fortunately for wine enthusiasts, almost all state chose to open up so consumers across the country now at least have the right to order wine from wineries.

But it has remained an open legal question whether this freedom for wineries to ship also applies to wine shops. In fact, only a handful of states allow wine shipments from out-of-state wine shops. It is arguably more important for consumers to be able to have wine shops ship across state lines than it is for wineries: while it is good to be able to receive wines from wineries directly, being able to buy from shops offers more price competition not to mention foreign wines, which account for a third of all wine sales in America.

The case to be argued on Wednesday, formally called Tennessee Wine & Spirits Association vs Blair, on face value is about whether Total Wine, a big box wine retailer with about 200 locations, should be allowed to open a store in the state. Local shop owners sued when Total Wine applied for a permit, arguing that only residents who have lived in the state for two years could own shops in the state, or as one new retailer told Forbes, it’s a “good ol’ boys system–economic protectionism at its worst.” Eric Asimov of the NYT describes the dynamic of how interstate retail sales were effectively stopped:

Urged on by the wholesalers, who lobbied and contributed heavily to state political campaigns, states began to crack down on interstate retail shipping, and carriers like FedEx and United Parcel Service specifically. Those companies have told retailers in recent years that they would no longer accept out-of-state shipments of alcoholic beverages unless they were bound for one of 14 states (along with Washington, D.C.) that explicitly permit such interstate commerce. Interstate wine shopping effectively ended for many people.

Groups such as the National Association of Wine Retailers have filed a brief in the case, as has a group of consumers. Paul D. Clement, they lawyer who filed the consumer brief and a former Solicitor General, had a convincing quote in the NYT:

“Your typical winery has a production function and a retail function, and Granholm’s focus was on the retail side,” Mr. Clement said. “The interstate activity protected by Granholm wasn’t production, it was sales.”

Case details on SCOTUSBLOG

The post Wine spills onto the docket at the Supreme Court appeared first on Dr Vino's wine blog.

Blend Your Own Bottle of Wine Out at Sea

KING5
January 14, 2019

Blend wine with Chateau Ste. Michelle on select Holland America cruises.

If you’ve ever wanted to be a winemaker, now’s your chance. Washington’s founding winery Chateau Ste. Michelle provides a unique wine blending experience on board two of Holland America’s cruise ships. Guests can blend their own bottles from a selection of five different wines, design their own labels and enjoy their concoction with dinner.>>>Read the entire article and watch the video on KING5

The post Blend Your Own Bottle of Wine Out at Sea appeared first on Woodinville Wine Country.

Blend Your Own Bottle of Wine Out at Sea

KING5
January 14, 2019

Blend wine with Chateau Ste. Michelle on select Holland America cruises.

If you’ve ever wanted to be a winemaker, now’s your chance. Washington’s founding winery Chateau Ste. Michelle provides a unique wine blending experience on board two of Holland America’s cruise ships. Guests can blend their own bottles from a selection of five different wines, design their own labels and enjoy their concoction with dinner.>>>Read the entire article and watch the video on KING5

The post Blend Your Own Bottle of Wine Out at Sea appeared first on Woodinville Wine Country.